How Pitching Songs is Baseball


How Pitching Songs is Baseball

Though some find it boring, I like baseball. The strategy is fantastic. You're up at bat, and you've studied your craft. You've accrued knowledge from watching others play, swing, and hit the ball. So you've practiced on a tee, then in the batting cage, and now you're up to bat. What pitch is coming? Fastball...curveball...slider? Sinker?

You're ready, you get the pitch, and you swing. You either hit it, or you miss it. It could be a foul ball, or single! Maybe a homerun! But if you miss it, all you do is reset and swing at the next pitch. You have an opportunity to make a slight adjustment...maybe your elbow needs to come up a bit. Maybe your stride should be a little shorter. Either way, you swing again...and again, and again. If you strikeout, you have other at-bats. You take the information you've received from your prior swings, and you swing again.

Ask Google, "What is considered a good batting average?" As of this writing it will tell you ".275, and players with batting averages above .300 are considered to be very good batters." This means out of every 10 at-bats, one could expect to hit the ball 3 times, and get on base (or put one out the park and round the bases). So one misses 70% of the time, and is still considered to be very good. The point is to focus on what will better your chances, and in the context of your song, how can you work toward reaching the success you define for your song.

Not every writer or artist is going after the homerun. Some are trying to get on base...singles, doubles. You swing enough, sure you may hit one or two over the fence. But define what you're going after. Get in the batting cage (studio, writing room), work on your craft (write, get feedback), and get out their and swing! 

Write that next song. Record that next song. Release that next song. Pitch or promote that next song. But do so equipped with a plan, information, excitement. Make adjustments where you see you can have a better chance of reaching your goal for your song, and just...keep...swinging.

- Jared@TheSongScope.com


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